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Driving Question: 

How do we transform text into action?

Drama
Grade 6

Building on prior knowledge of monologues, students answered questions about themselves to create a monologue to be performed. The students got know each other better and build upon their acting and drama skills. Students wrote their monologue based on these questions, read it aloud and received feedback from their peers. Students revised their work and then chose another student's monologue to perform. Students then rehearsed their monologue in class and received individual coaching from their teacher and fellow students. Their final performances focused on vocal coaching, pace, pausing, physical choices and other important aspects of dramatic monologues. Students also reflected throughout the project.

Student Reflection

"My favorite part was creating my own monologue. It was fun because I got to say stuff about me and my personality. The more challenging part was actually performing, because I have a bit of stage fright. Memorizing the lines was hard too, but I practiced by saying the lines in front of the mirror. I would recommend giving a bit more time to work on it because I think I needed more time to memorize the lines." - Ethan

"The best part was that we got to express how we act. We got to show our classmate show we act and our personalities. For instance, I'm a bit shy. I liked to also play people who are different. At the beginning, I wanted to only show my monologue, but when we did the other people's monologues it was fun. Since I was new, I got to know more about people. Everything was organized nicely, so I would keep that part of the project too." - Natalia

Student Products
  • Answer personal questions to create monologue
  • Receive feedback on draft monologue
  • Perform another student's monologue focusing on dramatic techniques
Teacher Reflection

“The feedback was immediate and allowed them to transform their performances in subtle ways. They didn't have to wait to get on their feet and try out their ideas, and thus we more successful. Starting with something active that drew on prior knowledge and experience allowed the students to start at a higher level. They were able to go deeper, because we didn't spend as much time building knowledge." - Ms. Amy Sidwell

Designers

Amy Sidwell